What happens when a content site stops optimizing for page views?

Hunter Walk, discussing The Information, which charges $400 for an annual subscription:

For me the value in The Information is not solely in what they’re providing but what they’re leaving out. The ~two articles a day are both interesting. Because they’re not playing a page views game, they don’t need to overload me with 25+ posts every 24 hrs. The site is spartan because they don’t need to worry about IAB units. A small number of writers building their beats give me the chance to see each journalist’s style distinctly, not settle into some random byline slot machine of varying quality.

Some folks are raising an eyebrow on the pricetag. “What are you getting that’s worth it?” Strangely my reply is as much about the 80% I’m not getting as the 20% they’re delivering.

Or to put this another way: in a world awash with pageview-driven content and no robust way to filter for quality, a service with a high signal-to-noise ratio is valuable.

3 thoughts on “What happens when a content site stops optimizing for page views?

  1. Pingback: Why websites shouldn’t optimize for page views | A Founder's Notebook

  2. Pingback: Why the Facebook threat to most media businesses will only get worse | A Founder's Notebook

  3. Pingback: Why Facebook’s pressure on media businesses will get worse | A Founder's Notebook

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