A framework for growth hacking using Job To Be Done

Edited excerpt from Building your growth model and Ladder of Engagement by Josh Elman:

As you are building a growth model for your company, here are the key questions to answer:

Purpose: What is the core purpose of the product?
Users: Who will care about that core purpose?
Inception: How can I get people to hear about this product for this purpose?
Adoption: What does someone need to do to get the product to fulfill this purpose for them?
Habit: How frequently should the person use the product, and how can we get them to adopt the habit?

Notes:
(1) Cf. Ben Yoskowitz’s framework — (i) Marketing/Growth, (ii) Onboarding, (iii) First User Experience and (iv) Ongoing Engagement — in How to set priorities in product development.
(2) By identifying the product’s Purpose before its Users, the impact is the same as using the Job To Be Done framework: what job does this product do, who wants to do that job, and (once you’ve ascertained that the job is valuable enough and enough people want to get it done) how can we improve our product to better do this job?
(3) This contrasts with the standard customer development framework, where you first identify your target users and then ask what is most valuable to those users. The problem with this is that it’s too unconstrained — your users may care about a lot of things, but many of them have nothing to do with your product. This may create tension between feedback and vision in product management, and lead to premature pivoting.
(4) Due to its importance for product management, I’ve created a category for Job To Be Done. You can also find the posts in my list of startup best practices.
(5) “How frequently should the person use the product, and how can we get them to adopt the habit?” — see (i) The relationship between frequency of habit and customer retention and (ii) How valuable is your product? Google’s “toothbrush test.

3 thoughts on “A framework for growth hacking using Job To Be Done

  1. Pingback: How to ensure new product initiatives are user-centric | A Founder's Notebook

  2. Pingback: Five questions to ensure that product designers focus on the Job To Be Done | A Founder's Notebook

  3. Pingback: How to ensure new product initiatives are customer-centric - School of Thinking

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